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Lydia Whitaker

Position/Status

Research Associate

E-mail Address

lrw39@cam.ac.uk

Phone

+ 44 (0)1223

Qualifications

  • PhD Psychology (University of Essex)
  • MSc Research Methods in Psychology (University of Essex)
  • BSc Psychology (University of Essex)

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Profile

Lydia has worked in education examining social and emotional abilities of typical and atypical children for over 8 years. Lydia’s PhD examined Emotion Category Boundaries in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in mainstream and special educational needs schools. Lydia’s areas of interest adopt a mixed-methods approach and center around the relationship between emotion labels and emotion category boundaries in typical and atypical populations.

Academic Area/Links

  • Teaching Effectively All Children (TEACh)
  • Research for Equitable Access and Learning (REAL) Centre

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Current Research Project(s)

Lydia is a Research Associate for the Teaching Effectively All Children (TEACh) project in the Research for Equitable Access and Learning (REAL) Centre. The TEACh project aims to identify which teaching styles develop learning outcomes in children from disadvantaged backgrounds in India and Pakistan.


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Principal and Recent Publications

Whitaker, L., & Widen, S. (2017). How does emotional intelligence relate to adolescents’ interpretation of cues for disgust? Cognition and Emotion, 1-8.

Whitaker, L., Simpson, A., & Roberson, D. (2017). Is impaired classification of subtle facial expressions in children with autism spectrum disorders related to atypical emotion category boundaries? Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 1-7.

Roberson, D., & Whitaker, L., (2016). Comment on “Language and Emotion”: Metaphor, morality and contested concepts. Emotion Review, 1754073915595100

Whitaker, L., Jones, C.R.G., Wilkins, A., & Roberson, D. (2015). Judging the intensity of emotional expression in faces: the effects of tints on individuals with autism spectrum disorder. Autism Research, 9, 450-459

Whitaker, L., Jones, C. R., Wilkins, A. J., & Roberson, D. (2013). Individuals with autism spectrum disorders benefit from the addition of coloured tints when discriminating intensities of facial expressions. Perception, 42, 82-82.

Roberson, D., Kikutani, M., Doge, P., Whitaker, L., & Majid, A. (2012). Shades of emotion: What the addition of sunglasses or masks to faces reveals about the development of facial expression processing. Cognition, 125, 195-206.


Invited talks

Development of the Disgust Concept in Adolescence: When does the “disgust face” become disgusted? Whitaker, L., & Widen, S. C. Experimental Psychology Society, Oxford, 8th-11th July 2016.

Autism Spectrum Disorder, coloured tints and the processing of faces. Whitaker, L. Visual Stress and vision-related reading difficulty Seminar, Salisbury, 11th June, 2015

Recognition of subtle angry expressions of emotion by individuals with ASD. Whitaker, L. Cognitive Research Group, University of Central Lancashire, 10th December, 2014

Examining young people's values and behaviours around alcohol use and aggression. Whitaker, L. ECM/Student Services Deputy Heads meeting, Sir John Thursby, Lancashire, 18th September, 2014

Examining young people's values and behaviours around alcohol use and aggression. Whitaker, L. Our Lady’s Catholic College 3rd December, 2014

Can individuals with ASD recognize subtle angry expressions of emotion? Whitaker, L., Jones, C.R.G., & Roberson, D. CASTL meeting, University of Bath, 11th December, 2013

Individuals with autism spectrum disorders benefit from the addition of coloured tints when discriminating intensities of facial expressions. Whitaker, L., Jones, C.R.G., Wilkins, A., & Roberson, D. Colour Group meeting, City University London, 9th October 2013

Children with autism spectrum disorder do not benefit from being oriented to the most informative part of the face when classifying angry facial expressions of emotion. Whitaker, L., Jones, C.R.G., & Roberson, D. International Society for Research on Emotion, University of California, Berkeley, 2nd-6th August 2013

Children with ASD do not benefit from being oriented to the most informative part of the face when classifying emotions. Whitaker, L., Jones, C.R.G., & Roberson, D. Internal seminar series, Psychology Department, University of Essex, March 2012

How do children process facial expressions of emotion? Whitaker, L., & Roberson, D. Market Field School, Essex, December 2011

Featural and configural processing of faces and objects in children with Autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Whitaker, L., & Roberson, D. Postgraduate Conference, Psychology department, University of Essex, May 2011


Conference Posters

Whitaker, L., Brown. S., Qualter, P., Young,. B., & Coyne. S. Script Representations of Alcohol-Related Aggression in 11-16 Year-Old Alcohol-Naïve Adolescents. Society for Research in Child Development 2015 Biennial Meeting, 19th-21st March 2015

Whitaker, L., Jones, C.R.G., Wilkins, A., & Roberson, D. Individuals with autism spectrum disorders benefit from the addition of coloured tints when discriminating intensities of facial expressions. European Conference on Visual Perception, Bremen, Germany, 25th-29th August 2013

Whitaker, L., Jones, C. R. G., Wilkins A. J. & Roberson, D. Individuals with autism spectrum disorders benefit from the addition of coloured tints when discriminating intensities of facial expressions. Experimental Psychology Society, Bangor, 3rd-5th July 2013

Whitaker, L., Roberson, D., & Jones, C. R. G. Children with autism spectrum disorder do not benefit from being oriented to the most informative part of the face when classifying angry facial expressions of emotion, Experimental Psychology Society, Bristol, July 11th-13th July 2012

Whitaker, L., Jones, C.R.G., & Roberson, D. Children with ASD do not benefit from being oriented to the most informative part of the face when classifying emotions, International Meeting for Autism Research, Toronto, Canada, May 17th-19th 2012

Whitaker, L., Brown. S., Qualter, P., Young,. B., & Coyne. S. Script Representations of Alcohol-Related Aggression in 11-16 Year-Old Alcohol-Naïve Adolescents. Society for Research in Child Development 2015 Biennial Meeting, 19th-21st March 2015

Whitaker, L., Jones, C.R.G., Wilkins, A., & Roberson, D. Individuals with autism spectrum disorders benefit from the addition of coloured tints when discriminating intensities of facial expressions. European Conference on Visual Perception, Bremen, Germany, 25th-29th August 2013

Whitaker, L., Jones, C. R. G., Wilkins A. J. & Roberson, D. Individuals with autism spectrum disorders benefit from the addition of coloured tints when discriminating intensities of facial expressions. Experimental Psychology Society, Bangor, 3rd-5th July 2013

Whitaker, L., Roberson, D., & Jones, C. R. G. Children with autism spectrum disorder do not benefit from being oriented to the most informative part of the face when classifying angry facial expressions of emotion, Experimental Psychology Society, Bristol, July 11th-13th July 2012

Whitaker, L., Jones, C.R.G., & Roberson, D. Children with ASD do not benefit from being oriented to the most informative part of the face when classifying emotions, International Meeting for Autism Research, Toronto, Canada, May 17th-19th 2012