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People

CRiCLE-Net: Associates

Karen Ashton

Karen Ashton     Massey University

Karen Ashton is Senior Lecturer at Massey University in New Zealand. She holds a PhD in cross-language comparability of reading proficiency from the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Before joining Massey University, she was a Senior Research and Validation Manager at Cambridge Assessment in the UK and worked on several key projects, including Asset Languages, a multilingual assessment project for the Department for Education. She was also the project manager for the European Survey on Language Competences (SurveyLang), a project initiated by the European Commission which tested the language skills across 14 European countries. Her current research interests include ESOL, TESOL, community languages, assessment, the impact of assessments, comparability of assessments, international education surveys and large scale assessment methodology.

Asta Haukas

Åsta Haukås     University of Bergen 

Åsta Haukås is Professor of Applied Linguistics and Foreign Language Education in the Department of Foreign Languages, University of Bergen, Norway. Her research includes investigations into learners' and teachers' multilingualism, metacognition in language learning and teaching, and language learning from a cognitive linguistic perspective. She is also interested in teachers' professional development and how language teachers can collaborate across language subjects. In Bergen, she has worked with teachers of French, German and Spanish using Lesson Study as a tool for development and enhancing collaboration. Before starting to work at the university, Åsta Haukås was a language teacher for Norwegian, English and German in secondary school.

Constant Leung

Constant Leung     King's College London

Constant Leung is Professor of Educational Linguistics in the Dept of Education and Professional Studies, King's College London. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences (UK). Before taking up teaching positions in higher education he taught in schools and worked as advisory teacher and manager in local government. He was the founding chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). His research interests include education in ethnically and linguistically diverse societies, additional/second language curriculum and assessment, language policy and teacher professional development. He serves as Editor of Research Issues of TESOL Quarterly, Senior Associate Editor of Language Assessment Quarterly, and as a member of the Editorial Boards of Assessment in Education, Australian Review of Applied Linguistics and the Modern Language Journal.

Martin Solly

Martin Solly     University of Turin

Martin Solly is Associate Professor of English Language and Linguistics in the Department of Culture, Politics and Society at the University of Turin in Italy. His current areas of interest include language education, language policy, sociolinguistics, multilingualism, language teaching / learning methodology, specialised discourse and literacy in academic and professional settings. He is particularly concerned with the relationship between language and context (institutional, disciplinary, intercultural, community), as well as with how language choice impacts on the construction and representation of identity. An active participant in various research projects at both European and national level, in 2011-2012 he was a visiting scholar at the University of Cambridge Faculty of Education.

Catherine Wallace

Catherine Wallace    University College London

Catherine Wallace is Professor of Education in the Department of Culture, Communication and Media at the Institute of Education, University College London. She has worked in Higher Education in the UK for 37 years and, before then, lectured in English as a foreign language in Italy and Brazil. Her areas of interest are sociolinguistics, critical literacy, multilingualism and classroom interaction, in particular language and identity and the negotiation of rights in multilingual classrooms. She is on the Advisory Board for Language Issues, the journal of NATECLA (National Association for Teaching English and Other Community Languages to Adults). She is the author of a number of books and articles on literacy, including Critical Reading in Language Education and a recent book: Literacy and the Bilingual Learner: Texts and Practices in London Schools.