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People

CRiCLE-Net: Working Group

Filio Constantinou

Filio Constantinou

Filio Constantinou is an educationist and an applied linguist. She holds a BA in Education Sciences (University of Cyprus), an MA in Language Learning and Education (University of York), an MPhil in Educational Research (University of Cambridge) and a PhD in Educational Linguistics (University of Cambridge). Her doctoral research focused on the linguistic challenges facing immigrant students in bidialectal communities. Her research interests span bilingualism, bidialectism, educational inequalities, language ideologies, writing performance and educational assessment. She is currently working as a researcher at the Research Division of Cambridge Assessment, University of Cambridge.

Edith Esch

Edith Esch

Edith Esch was Director of Cambridge University Language Centre and Senior Research Fellow in the Faculty of Education. She is currently Emeritus Fellow of Lucy Cavendish College. Her main current research is in second language education with a special interest in the influence of the British and French pedagogical cultures in post-colonial contexts and more particularly in multilingual societies in Africa where both are in contact. These sociolinguistic and sociocultural themes in education result from her life-long interest in bilingualism, cross-linguistic communication in non-educational contexts, and factors of language change. She has been recently invited to speak at the 18th Commonwealth Conference of Commonwealth Education Ministers in Mauritius.

Karen Forbes

Karen Forbes

Karen Forbes is Lecturer in Second Language Education in the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. She completed her PhD in second language education in the Faculty and recently worked as a research associate on an AHRC project on multilingualism. Within the Faculty, she mainly teaches on the PGCE in Modern Foreign Language and MPhil/MEd in Research in Second Language Education programmes. Her main interests lie in the use of learning strategies in language classrooms and in community language education. In the past she has worked as a teacher of Modern Foreign Languages (French and Spanish) in a Cambridgeshire secondary school and has also taught English as a Foreign Language both in a school in Spain and at various language schools in the UK. Her PhD research looks at cross-linguistic transfer of L2 writing strategies: Developing L1 and L2 writing through metacognitive strategy use.

Zhuxia Fu

Zhuxia Fu

Zhuxia is a PhD candidate at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. She studied for her BA in English Language and Literature at Sichuan University in China. During her undergraduate study, she took an one-year exchange program at the University of Barcelona in Spain, where she developed her interests in second language teaching and gained some experience of teaching Mandarin as a foreign language. She then received her MPhil in Research in Second Language Education from the University of Cambridge. Her current research interests are in classroom talk, genre-based pedagogies and second language writing. Her doctorate project is specifically focused on the role of talk as a mediating tool in promoting Chinese EFL learners’ conceptual development of genre in second language writing classrooms.

aretousa   giannakou

Aretousa Giannakou

Aretousa holds a BA in Spanish Philology, a BA in Education Sciences (both from the University of Athens, Greece), a Specialization Diploma in Teaching Spanish as a Foreign Language (Catholic University of Chile), a Master’s degree in Latin American Literature (University of Chile), and an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education (University of Cambridge). She has taught Modern Greek as a second/foreign language in Chile for six years seconded by the Greek Ministry of Education. Aretousa is currently a PhD student in Spanish and Portuguese at the Faculty of Modern and Medieval Languages of the University of Cambridge. Her doctoral research aims to investigate the change in the linguistic repertoire of Greek heritage speakers in South America.

Anne Ife

Anne Ife

Anne Ife is Research Fellow at Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge where she has for many years taught Spanish and applied linguistics. She currently leads an MA module: Language, Identity and Policy, which reflects her research interests in the learning of second languages, the policy and practice of second language use, and language diversity and policy, especially in Europe. She has published a wide range of articles and chapters on aspects of second language learning and more recently on lingua franca use in intercultural communication. For a number of years she was an assessor for the RSA Diploma in the Teaching of Community Languages in Spanish community schools in Cambridge and London. She has also reviewed appeals in relation to community language assessments for the Chartered Institute of Linguists.

Yongcan Liu

Yongcan Liu    

Yongcan Liu is Senior Lecturer in Second Language Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge and Coordinator of the MPhil/MEd in Research in Second Language Education programme. Broadly speaking, his research is based on two sociocultural theoretical frameworks: Community of Practice theory, from a sociological/situational perspective, focusing on issues of identity, participation and social practice, and Cultural Historical Activity Theory, which takes a socio-cognitive view and deals with issues such as mediation, regulation and potential development. He brings together these two theoretical perspectives to understand the social nature of second language teaching, learning and teacher professional development. His recent research focuses on bilingual children's language development, social integration and educational achievement.

Rob  Neal

Rob Neal

After graduating from the University of Birmingham (BA Hons: French and German), Rob spent two years in Japan where he worked as an assistant English teacher. He then completed a Masters degree in TESOL at Lancaster University before teaching English for two and a half years at Peking University. Upon returning to England he did a PGCE in Modern Foreign Languages at Sheffield University and currently teaches Mandarin at an inner city school in Manchester where most of the students are from minority ethnic backgrounds. He is currently studying for an MEd/PhD at Cambridge University where he is researching why the acquisition of Mandarin tones is so challenging for Anglophone learners. He has been involved in the 'Our Languages' Project which emphasizes collaboration between 'mainstream' and 'community' schools.

Joy Okwuonu

Joy Okwuonu

Joy Okwuonu is currently an undergraduate student at the University of Cambridge who is studying Education with English. Her Igbo heritage and her apparent inability to proficiently understand and communicate in Igbo has stimulated her interest in: the view that indigenous language learning is dwindling among youths and children living in African diaspora. This interest also encompasses investigating the need to make the paths to language learning more accessible to children and adults alike – especially considering the potential social and cultural benefits. Her previous volunteering opportunities in nursery, primary and secondary schools have contributed another area of interest: that is, the interaction between introverted or more reserved personality types in the classroom environment and later language and communication competency.

Tianyi Wang

Tianyi Wang

Tianyi is a continuing PhD student in the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge, after the completion of her Mphil in Research in Second Language Education. Her current research interests are language learning motivation, multilingualism and third language learning. Before her postgraduate study, Tianyi obtained her bachelor degree in English with particular focus on teaching Chinese as a foreign language at Sun Yat-sen University in China. She has also worked as a Chinese tutor for one year during her undergraduate study, which cultivated her initial interests in second language learning and teaching. Her PhD research is a mixed method study on Chinese learners' motivations in learning a third language in a Chinese university.

Biljana Savikj

Biljana Savikj

Biljana is a continuing PhD student at the Faculty of Education following the completion of her MPhil degree. Prior to joining the Faculty, Biljana did her BA in English Language and Literature at Ss Cyril and Methodius University in Skopje, Macedonia. Biljana has taught English as a foreign language to primary and secondary school students as well as adults for five years. She has also worked as a Grade teacher in an international school in Macedonia which involved teaching school subjects in English to students with different first languages and social backgrounds. This experience instilled in Biljana passion to investigate multilingualism, social mobility and second language acquisition, socialisation in multicultural settings, and Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL).

Harper Staples

Harper Staples

Harper is a current PhD student in the Faculty of Education. Her research focuses on the development and negotiation of multilingual identity in adolescent language learners during the L3 acquisition process, and aims to explore what factors impact, positively or negatively, upon the construction of multilinguality in different contexts of learning. She is particularly interested in the dynamic relationship between the individual and their context and the application of complexity theories in educational research. Prior to joining MEITS, she completed a Masters degree in Theoretical Linguistics at the University of Oxford, and has worked in the fields of foreign language teaching and translation in both France and Denmark.

Jinshi Shao

Jinshi Shao

Jinshi is a PhD candidate at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. He holds a BA in English Language and Linguistics from Xiamen University in China and an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education from the University of Cambridge. His current research interest lies in Vygotsky’s sociocultural theory of mind and its application to language learning and assessment. In addition, he also has an avid interest in applied psycholinguistics and the interaction approach to second language acquisition. Jinshi’s doctoral research is on using dynamic assessment, an alternative assessment framework based on Vygotsky’s sociocultural theory, to understand and promote the development of second language reading comprehension ability in Chinese learners of English.