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Publications

  • Christie, D., Tolmie, A., Thurston, A., Howe, C., & Topping, K. (2009). Supporting group work in Scottish primary classrooms: Improving the quality of collaborative dialogue. Cambridge Journal of Education, 39, 141-156.
  • Coltman, P., Warwick, J., Wilmott, J., Pino Pasternak, D. & Whitebread, D. (2013) Teachers co-constructing pedagogical practices to support children’s exploratory talk and self-regulation: the Children Articulating Thinking (ChAT) project. In D. Whitebread, N. Mercer, C. Howe & A. Tolmie (Eds.). Self-regulation and dialogue in primary classrooms. British Journal of Educational Psychology Monograph Series II: Psychological Aspects of Education – Current Trends, No. 10. (pp. 127-146). Leicester: BPS.
  • Danielsson, A. & Warwick, P. (2015) Identity and Discourse: Gee's discourse analysis as a way of approaching the constitution of primary science teacher identities, in L. Avraamidou (Ed.), Studying Science Teacher Identity: theoretical, methodological and empirical explorations. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers.
  • Flitton, L. & Warwick P. (2013) From classroom analysis to whole school professional development: promoting talk as a tool for learning across school departments. Professional Development in Education, 39, 1, 99-121.
  • Grau, V. & Whitebread, D. (2012). Self and social regulation of learning during collaborative activities in the classroom: The interplay of individual and group cognition. Learning and Instruction, 22(6), 401-12.
  • Grau, V., Calcagni, E., Preiss, D. D., & Ortiz, D. (in press). Teachers’ professional development through university-school partnerships: theoretical standpoints and evidence from two pilot studies in Chile. Cambridge Journal of Education. 20(1). 1-18. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0305764X.2015.1102867
  • Hassler, B., Major, L. Warwick, P., Watson, S., Hennessy, S., & Nicholl, B. (2016). Perspectives on Technology, Resources and Learning: productive classroom practices, effective teacher professional development. Cambridge: Faculty of Education University of Cambridge. (Report commissioned by ARM, www.arm.com)
  • Hennessy, S. (2011). The role of digital artefacts on the interactive whiteboard in mediating dialogic teaching and learning. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 27 (6), 463-489.
  • Hennessy, S. (2014). Bridging between research and practice: Supporting professional development through collaborative studies of classroom teaching with interactive whiteboard technology. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers.
  • Hennessy, S., Dragovic, T. & Warwick, P. (forthcoming). Promoting dialogic teaching with interactive technologies through a research-informed professional development workshop programme. 
  • Hennessy S., Rojas-Drummond S., Higham R., García Carrion R., Maine F., Torreblanca O., Márquez A., Ríos Silva, R. & Barrera, M-J (2016). Developing an analytic coding scheme for classroom dialogue across cultural and educational contexts. Learning, Culture and Social Interaction 9, 16-44. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lcsi.2015.12.001.
  • Hennessy, S., Warwick, P., Brown, L., Rawlins, D., & Neale, C. (Eds.). (2014). Developing Interactive Teaching and Learning Using the Interactive Whiteboard: A Resource for Teachers. Maidenhead: Open University Press.
  • Hennessy, S. & Warwick, P. (2014).  Using Theory in Research to Stimulate New Ways of Framing and Supporting Classroom Dialogue, in S. Hennessy, Bridging between Research and Practice: supporting Professional Development through Collaborative Studies of Classroom Teaching with Technology. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers. pp 265-282.
  • Hennessy, S., Warwick, P., & Mercer, N. (2011). A dialogic inquiry approach to working with teachers in developing classroom dialogue. Teachers College Record, 113 (9), 1906-1959.
  • Higham, R. (2016, in press) Communication Breakdown: the role of conflict in promoting responsible leadership in students. School Leadership and Management.
  • Higham, R., Brindley, S., & van de Pol, J. (2014) Shifting the primary focus: Assessing the case for dialogic education in secondary classrooms. Language and Education, 28 (1), 86-99.
  • Howe, C., & McWilliam D. (2001). Peer argument in educational settings. Journal of Language and Social Psychology, 20, 61-80.
  • Howe, C., & Mercer, N. (2007). Children’s social development, peer interaction and classroom learning. The Primary Review. Cambridge: University of Cambridge.
  • Howe, C. (2009). Collaborative group work in middle childhood: Joint construction, unresolved contradiction, and the growth of knowledge. Human Development, 52, 215-239.
  • Howe, C. (2010). Peer dialogue and cognitive development: A two-way relationship? In Littleton, K. & Howe, C. (eds.) Educational dialogues: Understanding and promoting productive interaction (pp. 32-47). London: Routledge.
  • Howe, C., & Abedin, M. (2013). Classroom dialogue: A systematic review across four decades of research. Cambridge Journal of Education, 43, 325-356.
  • Howe, C. (2013). Dialogue and self-regulation in the primary classroom: Concluding comments. British Journal of Education Monograph Series, 11, 10, 147-156.
  • Howe, C. (2013). Scaffolding in context: Peer interaction and abstract learning. Learning, Culture and Social Interaction, 2, 3-10
  • Howe, C. (2014). Optimizing small group discourse in classrooms: Effective practices and theoretical constraints. International Journal of Educational Research, 63, 107-115.
  • Howley, M., & Howe, C. (2004). Social interaction and cognitive growth: An examination through the role-taking skills of deaf and hearing children. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 22, 219-243.
  • Johnson, M. and Black, B. (2012) Feedback as scaffolding: Senior Examiner monitoring processes and their effects on examiner marking. Research in Post-Compulsory Education 17(4), 391-407.
  • Johnson, M. (2014) Insights into contextualised learning: how do professional examiners construct shared understanding through feedback? E-Learning and Digital Media, 11(4), 363-378.
  • Johnson, M. (2014) A case study of inter-examiner feedback from a UK context: Mixing research methods to gain insights into situated learning interactions. Formation et pratiques d’enseignement en questions, 17, 67-88.
  • Johnson, M. (2015) Articulation work: insights into examiners’ expertise from their remote feedback interactions. Communication & Language at Work, 1(4), 28-52.
  • Johnson, M. (2016) Feedback effectiveness in professional learning contexts. Review of Education, 4(2), 195-229. Littleton, K., & Howe, C. (Eds.). (2010). Educational dialogues: Understanding and promoting productive interaction. Abingdon: Routledge.
  • Littleton, K. & Mercer, N. (2013). Interthinking: Putting talk to work. Abingdon: Routledge.
  • Maine, F. (2013). How children talk together to make meaning from texts: A dialogic perspective on reading comprehension, Literacy, 47 (3), 150-156.
  • Maine, F. (2014). ‘I wonder if they are going up or down’: children's co-constructive talk across the primary years. Education 3-13: International Journal of Primary, Elementary and Early Years Education, 42 (3) 298-312.
  • Maine, F (2015). Dialogic Readers: Children talking and thinking together about visual texts. London: Routledge.
  • Maine F. and Hofmann, R. (in press).Talking for meaning: the dialogic engagement of teachers and children in a small group reading context. International Journal of Educational Research DOI: 10.1016/j.ijer.2015.10.007
  • Mercer, N. (2008). The seeds of time: Why classroom dialogue needs a temporal analysis. Journal of the Learning Sciences, 17, 33-59.
  • Mercer, N. (2009). The analysis of classroom talk: Methods and methodologies. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 80, 1-14.
  • Mercer, N., Dawes, L., & Staarman, J.K. (2009). Dialogic teaching in the primary science classroom. Language and Education, 23, 353-369.
  • Mercer, N., Hennessy, S., & Warwick, P. (2010). Using interactive whiteboards to orchestrate classroom dialogue. Themed issue of Technology, Pedagogy and Education on Interactive Whole Class Technologies 19, 195-209.
  • Mercer, N., & Howe, C. (2012). Explaining the dialogic processes of teaching and learning: The value and potential of sociocultural theory. Language, Culture and Social Interaction, 1, 12-21.
  • Mercer, N., & Littleton, K. (2007). Dialogue and the development of children's thinking. London: Routledge.
  • Mercer, N., Warwick, P. & Ahmed, A. (forthcoming). An Oracy Assessment Toolkit: linking research and development in the assessment of students’ spoken language skills at age 11-12. Learning & Instruction.
  • Pino-Pasternak, D., Basilio, M. & Whitebread, D. (2014). Interventions and classroom contexts that promote self-regulated learning: Two intervention studies in United Kingdom primary classrooms. Psykhe, 23(2), 1-13.
  • Pino Pasternak, D., Whitebread, D. & Tolmie, A. (2010) A multi-dimensional analysis of parent-child interactions during academic tasks and their impact on children's self-regulated learning, Cognition and Instruction, 28 (3), 219-272.
  • Ruthven, K., Hofmann, R., & Mercer, N. (2011, July). A dialogic approach to plenary problem synthesis. Proceedings of the 35th Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education Developing Mathematical Thinking.
  • Vrikki, M., Warwick, P., Vermunt, J.D., Mercer, N. & van Halem, N. (forthcoming). Teacher learning in the context of Lesson Study: A video-based analysis of teacher discussions. Teaching and Teacher Education.
  • Warwick, P., Hennessy, S., & Mercer, N. (2011). Promoting teaching and school development through co-enquiry: Developing interactive whiteboard use in a 'dialogic classroom'. Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice, 17 (3), 303-324.
  • Warwick, P., & Kershner, R. (2008). Primary teachers' understanding of the interactive whiteboard as a tool for children's collaborative learning and knowledge building. Learning, Media and Technology, 33(4), 269-287.
  • Warwick, P., Mercer, N., & Kershner, R. (2013) ‘Wait, let’s just think about this’: using the interactive whiteboard and talk rules to scaffold learning for co-regulation in collaborative science activities. Learning, Culture and Social Interaction, Vol 2, 1, 42-51.
  • Warwick, P., Mercer, N., Kershner, R., & Kleine Staarman, J. (2010). In the mind and in the technology: the vicarious presence of the teacher in pupils' learning of science in collaborative group activity at the interactive whiteboard. Computers and Education, 55(1), 350-362.
  • Warwick, P., Vrikki, M., Vermunt, J., Mercer, N. & van Halem, N. (2016) Connecting observations of student and teacher learning outcomes: an examination of Lesson Study discussions in mathematics. ZDM: The International Journal on Mathematics Education. 48(4), 555-569.
  • Whitebread, D., Mercer, N., Howe, C. & Tolmie, A. (Eds.) (2013). Self-regulation and dialogue in primary classrooms. British Journal of Educational Psychology Monograph Series II: Psychological Aspects of Education – Current Trends, No. 10. Leicester: BPS.
  • Whitebread, D. & Pino Pasternak, D. (2013) Video analysis of self-regulated learning in social and naturalistic contexts: The case of preschool and primary school children. In S. Volet & M. Vaurus (Eds). Interpersonal Regulation of Learning and Motivation: Methodological Advances (pp. 14-44). New York: Springer.
  • Whitebread, D., Pino-Pasternak, D. & Coltman, P. (2015). Making Learning Visible: the role of language in the development of metacognition and self-regulation in young children. In S. Robson & S. Quinn (Eds.). The Routledge International Handbook of Young Children's Thinking and Understanding (pp. 199-214). London: Routledge.